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Tag Archives: French cinema

mariamacbeth

María Casares as The Princess and 
Marie Déa as Eurydice

Orpheus_image_02
Image courtesy of The Criterion Collection

Someday I will write some of my own thoughts, but today I post this article.

While he is perhaps more widely known for his lovely 1946 adaptation Beauty
and the Beast
, Jean Cocteau’s finest achievement is arguably Orpheus,
a 1950 update on the Greek myth of the same name.

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Some amazing shoots from Robert Bresson film “Les Dames du Bois de Bolougne”

Les Dames du Bois de Boulogne (Sept. 21, 1945) French film director Robert Bresson is famous for his use of non-professional actors. Prior to watching Les Dames du Bois de Boulogne, I had only seen one Bresson film, Pickpocket (1959), whose protagonist was most certainly not a professional actor. He shambled through the proceedings like a man on a heavy dose of tranquilizers, his movements slow, his eyes haunted. It was an interesting film, and one I may watch again some day, but it didn’t mo … Read More

via OCD Viewer

Child of Paradise: Marcel Carne and Golden Age of French cinema by Edward Baron Turk (Google books)

About Maria Casares as Natalie in Marcel Carne’s film “Children of Paradise”

http://books.google.com/booksid=UeSRvpTu2qoC&pg=PA281&dq=maria+casares&hl=ru&ei=Jr2RTZrOH4uq8AOJ8tTmAw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=6&ved=0CD4Q6AEwBTgU#v=onepage&q=maria%20casares&f=false

Material from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia; since it is a free encyclopedia, I post the material here ^_^

María Casares (21 November 1922 – 22 November 1996) was a Spanish actress and one of the most distinguished stars of the French stage. She was usually credited in France as Maria Casarès.

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Death and her Judges

Death at the tribunal

The shot from “Orphee” by Jean Cocteau

A petite, intense, slender, raven-haired Spanish stage actress whose career was focused primarily in France, Maria Casares made only minimal film appearances, but with memorable impact. The daughter of a Republican minister, she and her family fled to Paris at the advent of the Spanish Civil War. At that time, Casares spoke no French, yet within three years, she had enrolled at the Paris Conservatoire and by 1942 had her first notable stage triumph in John Millington Synge’s “Deirdre of the Sorrows”. Based on this success, she was offered the leading role in Albert Camus’ “Le Malentendu” which led to a three-year relationship with the author. Even after the couple separated, Casares had played roles in two of his stage plays, “Etat de Siege” (1948) and “Les Justes” (1949). They remained on friendly terms until his death in an automobile accident in January 1960.

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